Journal of Applied Phycology

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 5–13

Isolation and purification of Australian isolates of the toxic cyanobacteriumMicrocystis aeruginosa Kütz

  • Christopher J. S. Bolch
  • Susan I. Blackburn
Article

Abstract

Isolation and laboratory culture ofMicrocystis aeruginosa Kütz. using a growth medium (MLA medium) suitable for both non-axenic and axenic cultures is described. Seventeen established strains ofM. aeruginosa were subjected to one or more of three purification methods: centrifugation cleaning, sulphide gradient selection, and antibiotic treatment (Imipenem®). While each method purified only about half of the strains attempted, the selective application of each method, based on the morphological characteristics of the strains, succeeded in purifying 12 of the 17 strains. Three of the 5 strains not purified were contaminated with a sulphide-tolerant, Imipenem-resistant spirochaete,Spirochaeta cf.aurantia, which could not be detected on normal, broad spectrum bacterial test media. The presence of this bacterial species was detected only by phase contrast and DAPI (4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) stained fluorescence microscopy.

Key words

axenic culture cyanobacteria Microcystis toxic Spirochaeta 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher J. S. Bolch
    • 1
  • Susan I. Blackburn
    • 1
  1. 1.CSIRO Division of FisheriesHobartAustralia

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