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Survival and competitive ability of ammonia excreting and nonammonia excretingAzotobacter chroococcum strains in sterile soil

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Summary

The survival of two multiple antibiotic resistant native isolates ofAzotobacter chroococcum (A10 and A42), one of them (A10) having high nitrogenase activity and high ammonia excreting ability and another (A42) having low nitrogenase activity and low ammonia excreting ability were studied in sterile sandy loam soil with amendments of compost and glucose and without amendments. The decrease in cell numbers over a period of four weeks in all the three types of treatments approximated 4 log units. However, the death rate was more in the first two weeks. In all the treatments A10 showed better survival and competitive ability than A42 both singly and in mixed culture.

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Singh, S., Lakshminarayana, K. Survival and competitive ability of ammonia excreting and nonammonia excretingAzotobacter chroococcum strains in sterile soil. Plant Soil 69, 79–84 (1982). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02185706

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Key words

  • Antibiotic resistance
  • Azotobacter chroococcum
  • Competition
  • Sandy-loam soil
  • Survival