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Plant and Soil

, Volume 82, Issue 3, pp 415–425 | Cite as

Host genes inPisum sativum L. conferring resistance to EuropeanRhizobium leguminosarum strains

  • T. A. Lie
Article

Summary

Using primitive and wild pea plants from Afghanistan, Iran and Turkey, three host genes were detected, which confer resistance to nodulation by Rhizobium strains of cultivated peas from Europe. A dominant gene Sym 1 controls temperature-sensitive nodulation in pea cv. Iran. Another gene Sym 2 confers general resistance to a large number of European Rhizobium strains at all temperatures used. The degree of dominance of the latter gene is dependent on the Rhizobium strain used. A third gene Sym 4 is responsible for specific resistance to a single Rhizobium strain.

Key words

Host-genetic control Nodulation Pisum sativum L. Rhizobium leguminosarum Symbiotic nitrogen fixation 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff/Dr W. Junk Publishers 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. A. Lie
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of MicrobiologyAgricultural UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands

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