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Plant and Soil

, Volume 86, Issue 2, pp 257–264 | Cite as

Chemical composition of whole plant and grain and yield of nutrients in grain of five barley cultivars

  • A. C. Dick
  • S. S. Malhi
  • P. A. O'Sullivan
  • D. R. Walker
Article

Summary

twenty seven field experiments were conducted to determine if there were differences between five barley cultivars in their ability to utilize soil nutrients. There were significant differences among cultivars in yield of grain and in concentration of all macro and micro nutrients examined in both the whole plant and grain.

Gateway ranked the highest for the concentration of Na, Mn, and Cu in the whole plant and was among the cultivars with highest concentration of Ca, Fe, and Zn. Centennial had generally the lowest concentration of all the nutrients determined in the whole plant. For the concentrations of Na, Mg, and Cu in grain Gateway ranked highest, but ranked third for the concentrations of K, Ca, Fe, Mn, and Zn in grain. Galt had the highest K and Mg concentration and lowest Mn, Cu and Zn concentration in grain. Except for K concentration in grain, Centennial had the lowest concentrations of all other cationic nutrients in grain.

Yield of grain rather than nutrient concentration was the most important criteria in determining the ranking of nutrient yields per hectare. Because of its high grain yield, Bonanza produced the largest yield of micronutrient cations and was second to Galt in production of macronutrient cations, although it was lowest in macronutrient cation concentration. Similarly, Bonanza and Galt had the lowest protein concentration, but produced the highest yield of protein per hectare.

The implications for animal nutrition of different levels of nutrients between cultivars are discussed.

Key words

Barley cultivars Chemical composition Macronutrients Micronutrients Protein 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. C. Dick
    • 1
  • S. S. Malhi
    • 1
  • P. A. O'Sullivan
    • 1
  • D. R. Walker
    • 1
  1. 1.Research StationAgriculture CanadaLacombeCanada

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