Journal of Applied Phycology

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 365–369 | Cite as

Production of the taste/odor-causing compound,trans-2,cis-6-nonadienal, within the Synurophyceae

  • James L. Wee
  • Susan A. Harris
  • James P. Smith
  • Christopher P. Dionigi
  • David F. Millie
Article

Abstract

Although several species of the Synurophyceae have been associated with taste and odor problems in potable water supplies, electron microscopic-based field studies linked problematic blooms only toSynura petersenii Korshikov. Eventually, the organic compoundtrans-2,cis-6-nonadienal was implicated to cause the associated ‘cucumberlike’ odors. The objective of this study was to survey unialgal cultures of various Synurophycean species for the occurrence oftrans-2,cis-6-nonadienal. The compound was detected throughout a 24-day growth assay with aS. petersenii isolate, but was not detected in an identical assay withSynura sphagnicola (Korshikov) Korshikov. In separate 24-day cultures,trans-2,cis-6-nonadienal was detected in two isolates from theS. petersenii species complex, but was not detected in isolates of twoMallomonas or fourSynura taxa not from theS. petersenii complex. These results support the hypothesis that production oftrans-2,cis-6-nonadienal is unique to taxa within theS. petersenii complex. When contrast-enhancing optics and specific specimen preparation techniques are employed, light microscopy can be used to distinguish taxa in theS. petersenii complex from all other Synurophycean taxa. These methods are suggested as an efficient way to monitortrans-2,cis-6-nonadienal-producing taxa in potable water supplies.

Key words

Mallomonas Synura Synurophyceae trans-2 cis-6-nonadienal taste and odor compounds water quality 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • James L. Wee
    • 1
    • 2
  • Susan A. Harris
    • 1
    • 2
  • James P. Smith
    • 1
    • 2
  • Christopher P. Dionigi
    • 2
  • David F. Millie
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesLoyola UniversityNew OrleansUSA
  2. 2.Southern Regional Research CenterAgricultural Research Service, United States Department of AgricultureNew OrleansUSA

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