Plant and Soil

, Volume 58, Issue 1–3, pp 367–382 | Cite as

A strategy for legume nodulation research in developing regions of the Old World

  • J. Brockwell
Experimental Approaches and Techniques

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References

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© ICARDA and Martinus Nijhoff/Dr. W. Junk Publishers 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Brockwell
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Plant IndustryCSIROCanberra CityAustralia

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