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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 25, Issue 6, pp 561–578 | Cite as

Empirically derived subtypes of pervasive developmental disorders: A cluster analytic study

  • Jay A. Sevin
  • Johnny L. Matson
  • David Coe
  • Steven R. Love
  • Mary J. Matese
  • Debra A. Benavidez
Article

Abstract

A cluster analytic study was conducted to empirically derive behaviorally homogeneous subtypes of pervasive developmental disorders (PDD). Subjects were clustered based on a broad range of behavioral symptoms which characterize autism. Behavioral variables were measured using several of the standardized psychometric instruments most commonly employed in assessing autistic individuals. The cluster solution indicated the presence of four distinct groups. Validity checks generally confirmed significant between-group differences on independent measures of social, language, and stereotyped behaviors. In addition, the four-group cluster solution was compared to previously developed typological systems of PDD (i.e., subcategories based on IQ, early onset, styles of social interaction, and DSM-III-R diagnosis). Results generally supported both the behavioral homogeneity of the four subgroups and also several important between-group differences. The potential utility of using cluster analyses to explore subtypes of PDD is discussed.

Keywords

Early Onset School Psychology Potential Utility Independent Measure Behavioral Symptom 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jay A. Sevin
    • 1
  • Johnny L. Matson
    • 1
  • David Coe
    • 1
  • Steven R. Love
    • 1
  • Mary J. Matese
    • 1
  • Debra A. Benavidez
    • 1
  1. 1.Louisiana State UniversityUSA

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