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Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 251, Issue 6, pp 720–726 | Cite as

Genome mapping ofClostridium perfringens strains with I-CeuI shows many virulence genes to be plasmid-borne

  • S. Katayama
  • B. Dupuy
  • S. T. Cole
  • G. Daube
  • B. China
Short Communication

Abstract

The intron-encoded endonuclease I-CeuI fromChlamydomonas eugametos was shown to cleave the circular chromosomes of allClostridium perfringens strains examined at single sites in the rRNA operons, thereby generating ten fragments suitable for the rapid mapping of virulence genes by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). This method easily distinguishes between plasmid and chromosomal localisations, as I-CeuI only cuts chromosomal DNA. Using this approach, the genes for three of the four typing toxins,β, ε, andı, in addition to the enterotoxin andλ-toxin genes, were shown to be plasmid-borne. In a minority of strains, associated with food poisoning, where the enterotoxin toxin gene was located on the chromosome, genes for two of the minor toxins,ϑ andμ, were missing.

Key words

Gangrene Toxins Enterotoxin Plasmids Genome mapping 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Katayama
    • 1
  • B. Dupuy
    • 1
  • S. T. Cole
    • 1
  • G. Daube
    • 2
  • B. China
    • 2
  1. 1.Unité de Génétique Moléculaire Bactérienne, Institut PasteurParis Cédex 15France
  2. 2.Faculté de Médecine VétérinaireUniversité de LiègeLiègeBelgium

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