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Hypotony and experimental rubeosis iridis in primate eyes

A clinicopathologic study

Abstract

Rubeosis iridis was produced in cynomolgus monkeys by subjecting their eyes to severe surgically induced hypotony. New vessels on the iris showed characteristic fenestrations of endothelial cell walls as well as mitotic activity.

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Author information

Correspondence to Gholam A. Peyman.

Additional information

Supported in part by core grant 1P3EY01792 from the National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, and internal support grant 58124

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Peyman, G.A., Raichand, M., Juarez, C.P. et al. Hypotony and experimental rubeosis iridis in primate eyes. Graefe's Arch Clin Exp Ophthalmol 224, 435–442 (1986). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02173359

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Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Endothelial Cell
  • Cell Wall
  • Mitotic Activity
  • Cynomolgus Monkey