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Adaptive and intellectual functioning in autistic and nonautistic retarded children

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Abstract

This study examined the relationship between adaptive functioning on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS) and intellectual functioning on the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, 4th edition (SB-IV) in autistic children and nonautistic retarded children of comparable CA and SB-IV composite score (IQ). The autistic group had lower scores than the retarded group in VABS adaptive composite, Socialization domain, and Communication domain, and SB-IV Verbal Reasoning area. VABS domain scores yielded higher classification rates than the SB-IV area scores in discriminating the two groups. Correlations between the two measures were much higher for the autistic group than for the retarded group. Results support the conclusion that the cognitive impairment in autism is reflected in greater impairment in adaptive behaviors than in mental retardation without autism.

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Author information

Correspondence to Sam B. Morgan.

Additional information

This project was partially supported by a Center of Excellence grant from the State of Tennessee to the Department of Psychology, The University of Memphis. Appreciation is extended to the University of Tennessee Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities and to the children and parents who participated in this study.

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Carpentieri, S., Morgan, S.B. Adaptive and intellectual functioning in autistic and nonautistic retarded children. J Autism Dev Disord 26, 611–620 (1996). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02172350

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Keywords

  • Domain Score
  • Autistic Child
  • Intelligence Scale
  • Socialization Domain
  • Adaptive Functioning