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In vitro activity of enoxacin compared with norfloxacin and amikacin

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Abstract

The in vitro activity of enoxacin was tested against 1000 clinical isolates of gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms and compared with that of norfloxacin and amikacin. The MIC90 of enoxacin was 1 mg/l forEnterobacteriaceae, 2.6 mg/l forPseudomonas aeruginosa and 6.2 mg/l forStaphylococcus aureus. The inoculum effect was minimal. The MlCs and MBCs forPseudomonas aeruginosa strains were significantly affected by the addition of calcium and magnesium ions. Synergy was occasionally observed between enoxacin and the antibiotics tested; antagonism was rare.

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Correspondence to P. van der Auwera.

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van der Auwera, P., de Moor, G., Lacroix, G. et al. In vitro activity of enoxacin compared with norfloxacin and amikacin. Eur. J, Clin. Microbiol. 4, 55–58 (1985). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02148662

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Keywords

  • Calcium
  • Magnesium
  • Internal Medicine
  • Clinical Isolate
  • Amikacin