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Plant and Soil

, Volume 86, Issue 3, pp 387–394 | Cite as

Production of B-group vitamins by mycorrhizal fungi and actinomycetes isolated from the root zone of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.)

  • E. Strzelczyk
  • U. Leniarska
Article

Summary

Studies were carried out on synthesis of B-group vitamins by mycorrhizal fungi and actinomycetes (Streptomyces sp.) derived from soil, rhizosphere and mycorrhizosphere of pine.

None of the fungal isolates produced biotin. The vitamin produced in largest amounts by the mycorrhizal fungi was thiamin.

In general more actinomycetes isolated from the rhizosphere than from the root free soil produced B-group vitamins. This was particularly true for thiamin.

The amount of vitamins produced was higher in actinomycetes than the amounts produced by the mycorrhizal fungi.

Key words

Actinomycetes B-group vitamins Mycorrhizal fungi Mycorrhizosphere Pinus sylvestris Soil 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Strzelczyk
    • 1
  • U. Leniarska
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Biology, Laboratory of MicrobiologyNicolaus Copernicus UniversityToruńPoland

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