Journal of Psycholinguistic Research

, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 101–115 | Cite as

How do transcribers deal with audio recordings of spoken discourse?

  • Jean Lindsay
  • Daniel C. O'Connell
Article

Abstract

Four undergraduate volunteers, two women and two men, transcribed an audiotaped interview of former United States President Ronald Reagan by Dan Rather. Their first transcript was made from a single complete playing, with only pausing, but no repetition or replay allowed. Thereafter, two of the transcribers made corrections by an “on-line” method—complete playings as often as they wished. The two others were allowed an “off-line” method—unlimited playback of any portions. None produced a verbatim transcription, but all preserved semantic content quite well. Still, deletions were numerous, particularly of discourse markers and hesitation phenomena, both of which characterize spoken, not written discourse. Significantly more deletions in the on-line than in the off-line condition indicated the difficulty of audiotape processing without off-line replay. These results are discussed in light of recent theories of speech processing.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean Lindsay
    • 1
  • Daniel C. O'Connell
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyGeorgetown UniversityWashington, DC

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