Plant and Soil

, Volume 80, Issue 3, pp 321–335

Seasonal patterns of ammonium and nitrate uptake in nine temperate forest ecosystems

  • Knute J. Nadelhoffer
  • John D. Aber
  • Jerry M. Melillo
Article

Summary

Seasonal patterns of net N mineralization and nitrification in the 0–10 cm mineral soil of 9 temperate forest sites were analyzed using approximately monthlyin situ soil incubations. Measured nitrification rates in incubated soils were found to be good estimates of nitrification in surrounding forest soils. Monthly net N mineralization rates and pools of ammonium-N in soil fluctuated during the growing season at all sites. Nitrate-N pools in soil were generally smaller than ammonium-N pools and monthly nitrification rates were less variable than net N mineralization rates. Nitrate supplied most of the N taken up annually by vegetation at 8 of the 9 sites. Furthermore, despite the large fluctuations in ammonium-N pools and monthly net N mineralization, nitrate was taken up at relatively uniform rates during the growing season at most sites.

Key words

Alfisol Ammonification Nitrification Nitrogen mineralization Temperate forests 

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff/Dr W. Junk Publishers 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Knute J. Nadelhoffer
    • 1
  • John D. Aber
    • 1
  • Jerry M. Melillo
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  2. 2.Marine Biological LaboratoryThe Ecosystems CenterWoods HoleUSA

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