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Journal of Youth and Adolescence

, Volume 18, Issue 6, pp 567–582 | Cite as

“We were just talking ...”: Conversations in early adolescence

  • Marcela Raffaelli
  • Elena Duckett
Article

Abstract

This paper explores young adolescents' experience of talk, examining changes in boys' and girls' patterns of communication with family and friends. The data consist of immediate self-reports provided by 401 5th–9th grade students during the course of one week of their normal lives. Results indicate that while time spent talking to friends increased dramatically across this age period, especially for girls, talk with family members remained stable. Analysis of topics of conversation suggests that older children turned to friends for discussions of age-related concerns while continuing to discuss daily issues with family members. Talk with friends did not appear to replace talk with family members but rather represented a new facet of the social world, supplementing existing family relationships.

Keywords

Family Member Health Psychology School Psychology Family Relationship Early Adolescence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcela Raffaelli
    • 1
  • Elena Duckett
    • 2
  1. 1.Committe on Human DevelopmentUniversity of ChicagoChicago
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyLoyola University of ChicagoChicago

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