Journal of Traumatic Stress

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 75–90 | Cite as

The development of a Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale

  • Dudley David Blake
  • Frank W. Weathers
  • Linda M. Nagy
  • Danny G. Kaloupek
  • Fred D. Gusman
  • Dennis S. Charney
  • Terence M. Keane
Article

Abstract

Several interviews are available for assessing PTSD. These interviews vary in merit when compared on stringent psychometric and utility standards. Of all the interviews, the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS-1) appears to satisfy these standards most uniformly. The CAPS-1 is a structured interview for assessing core and associated symptoms of PTSD. It assesses the frequency and intensity of each symptom using standard prompt questions and explicit, behaviorally-anchored rating scales. The CAPS-1 yields both continuous and dichotomous scores for current and lifetime PTSD symptoms. Intended for use by experienced clinicians, it also can be administered by appropriately trained paraprofessionals. Data from a large scale psychometric study of the CAPS-1 have provided impressive evidence of its reliability and validity as a PTSD interview.

Key words

diagnosis post-traumatic stress disorder reliability structured interviews validity 

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Copyright information

© International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dudley David Blake
    • 1
  • Frank W. Weathers
    • 2
  • Linda M. Nagy
    • 3
  • Danny G. Kaloupek
    • 2
  • Fred D. Gusman
    • 1
  • Dennis S. Charney
    • 3
  • Terence M. Keane
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Veterans Affairs Medical CenterClinical Laboratory and Education Division, National Center for PTSD, Palo AltoUSA
  2. 2.Behavioral Science Division, National Center for PTSDBoston Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Tufts University School of MedicineUSA
  3. 3.Neurosciences Division, National Center for PTSDWest Haven Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Yale University School of MedicineUSA

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