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Social adjustment and placement of autistic children in Middlesex: A follow-up study

  • Victor Lotter
Articles

Abstract

A follow-up study of 32 autistic children identified in an epidemiological survey when they were 8 to 10 years of age and investigated 8 years later at 16 to 18 years of age is presented and discussed. Outcome is described in terms of general social adjustment, employment, and placement history. Results are contrasted with those for a comparison group identified in the original survey and those reported for comparably defined children in other studies. Only one autistic child was employed, and outcome was in general worse for the autistic group in which 62% required extensive care and supervision. There does not seem to be a direct relationship between employability and amount of schooling. Expectations with respect to outcome can be indicated with some confidence for comparable groups.

Keywords

Comparable Group Direct Relationship School Psychology Autistic Child Epidemiological Survey 
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Copyright information

© V. H. Winston & Sons, Inc. 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Victor Lotter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of GuelphGuelphCanada

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