Journal of Gambling Studies

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 275–285 | Cite as

Social, psychological and physical consequences of pathological gambling in Sweden

  • Cecilia Bergh
  • Eckart Kühlhorn
Articles

Abstract

Social, psychological and physical consequences of pathological gambling reported by 42 pathological gamblers recruited mainly by advertising were compared with data on 63 pathological gamblers identified by case-finding within districts of probation, in- and out-patient psychiatric care and social welfare authorities. The two studies gave similar results. Financial breakdown, impaired relations with family and friends, and psychological problems occurred in about 50% of the pathological gamblers. Physical consequences were perceived to be of minor significance. Gambling became a solitary behavior as illegal behaviors to finance gambling increased. The pathological gamblers frequently abused alcohol. Despite these signs of social decay the pathological gamblers strove not to be a burden in society.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cecilia Bergh
    • 1
  • Eckart Kühlhorn
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Clinical NeuroscienceKarolinska InstituteSweden
  2. 2.University of StockholmSweden

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