Current Microbiology

, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp 47–52

Coaggregation of urogenital bacteria in vitro and in vivo

  • Gregor Reid
  • Jacqueline A. McGroarty
  • P. A. Gil Domingue
  • Anthony W. Chow
  • Andrew W. Bruce
  • Andrea Eisen
  • J. William Costerton
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF02094024

Cite this article as:
Reid, G., McGroarty, J.A., Gil Domingue, P.A. et al. Current Microbiology (1990) 20: 47. doi:10.1007/BF02094024

Abstract

The working hypotheses of the present study were that (1) bacterial coaggregates exist in the urogenital tract of healthy and infected women, and (2) coaggregation reactions can occur in vitro between members of the urogenital flora. Examination of urogenital specimens from 25 healthy women showed that lactobacilli were the dominant organisms colonizing the epithelia and coaggregating with other Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In vitro light and electron microscopic studies confirmed that members of the urogenital flora could coaggregate. An examination of specimens from 9 women with urinary tract infection showed the presence of autoaggregated uropathogens free-floating in the urine and attached to epithelial cells. The phenomenon of autoaggregation was also noted in vitro for various uropathogens, suggestive that this may represent a virulence factor. It is evident that bacterial cell-to-cell binding within a strain and among different genera occurs in the urogenital tract. Further studies of the mechanisms that maintain and disrupt these microbial interactions will help to improve our understanding of disease initiation.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gregor Reid
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jacqueline A. McGroarty
    • 1
  • P. A. Gil Domingue
    • 3
  • Anthony W. Chow
    • 4
  • Andrew W. Bruce
    • 1
  • Andrea Eisen
    • 2
  • J. William Costerton
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Urology, Department of SurgeryUniversity of Toronto and Toronto General HospitalToronto
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of TorontoCanada
  3. 3.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of CalgaryCanada
  4. 4.Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of MedicineUniversity of British ColumbiaCanada

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