Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 41, Issue 2, pp 387–391

Risk of pancreatic and periampullar cancer following cholecystectomy

A population-based cohort study
  • A. Ekbom
  • J. Yuen
  • B. M. Karlsson
  • J. K. McLaughlin
  • H. O. Adami
Gastrointestinal Oncology

DOI: 10.1007/BF02093833

Cite this article as:
Ekbom, A., Yuen, J., Karlsson, B.M. et al. Digest Dis Sci (1996) 41: 387. doi:10.1007/BF02093833

Abstract

An increased risk of pancreatic cancer following cholecystectomy has been reported in some studies but not in others. In order to settle this question, a population-based cohort consisting of 62,615 patients who had undergone cholecystectomy was followed up for the occurrence of pancreatic and periampullar cancer up to 23 years. After excluding the first year after operation, there were 261 pancreatic cancers vs 216.8 expected [standardized incidence ratio (SIR)=1.20; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.06–1.37]; and 11 periampullar cancers vs 7.2 expected (SIR=1.52; 95% CI=0.76–2.72). The increased risk of pancreatic cancer was most prominent up to four years after operation, but was also significantly increased 15 years or more after operation (SIR=1.35; 95% CI=1.00–1.78). We conclude that there is a modest excess risk of pancreatic and periampullar cancer following cholecystectomy, most prominent up to four years after operation, but that also exists 15 years or more after operation.

Key words

cholecystectomy pancreatic cancer periampullar cancer epidemiology 

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Ekbom
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • J. Yuen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • B. M. Karlsson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • J. K. McLaughlin
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • H. O. Adami
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.From the Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Department of SurgeryUniversity HospitalUppsalaSweden
  2. 2.Epidemiology and Biostatistics Program, Division of Cancer EtiologyNational Cancer InstituteBethesda
  3. 3.Department of EpidemiologyHarvard School of Public HealthBoston

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