Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 41, Issue 10, pp 2078–2086

Increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant defenses in mucosa of inflammatory bowel disease

  • Lisa Lih-Brody
  • Saul R. Powell
  • Kevin P. Collier
  • Gautam M. Reddy
  • Renee Cerchia
  • Ellen Kahn
  • Gary S. Weissman
  • Seymour Katz
  • Robert A. Floyd
  • Matthew J. McKinley
  • Stanley E. Fisher
  • Gerard E. Mullin
Intestinal Disorders, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Immunology, And Microbiology

DOI: 10.1007/BF02093613

Cite this article as:
Lih-Brody, L., Powell, S.R., Collier, K.P. et al. Digest Dis Sci (1996) 41: 2078. doi:10.1007/BF02093613

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation whose cellular components are capable of oxidative respiratory bursts that may result in tissue injury. Mucosal biopsies were analyzed for protein carbonyl content (POPs), DNA oxidation products [8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)], reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), trace metals (copper, zinc, and iron) and superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn SOD). In Crohn's disease biopsies, there was an increase in ROIs, POPs, 8-OHdG, and iron, while decreased copper and Cu-Zn SOD activity were found in inflamed tissues compared to controls. For ulcerative colitis, there was an increase in ROIs, POPs, and iron in inflamed tissue compared to controls, while decreased zinc and copper were observed. An imbalance in the formation of reactive oxygen species and antioxidant micronutrients may be important in the pathogenesis and/or perpetuation of the tissue injury in IBD and may provide a rationale for therapeutic modulation with antioxidants.

Key words

oxygen free radicals inflammation tissue injury inflammatory bowel disease antioxidants 

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lisa Lih-Brody
    • 1
    • 2
  • Saul R. Powell
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kevin P. Collier
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gautam M. Reddy
    • 1
    • 2
  • Renee Cerchia
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ellen Kahn
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gary S. Weissman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Seymour Katz
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robert A. Floyd
    • 1
    • 2
  • Matthew J. McKinley
    • 1
    • 2
  • Stanley E. Fisher
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gerard E. Mullin
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.From the Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Pathology, Pediatrics, and the Research Laboratories of the Center for Pediatric Ileitis and Colitis of North Shore University Hospital-New YorkUniversity School of MedicineManhasset
  2. 2.the Free Radical Biology and Aging Research Program of the Oklahoma Medical Research FoundationOklahoma City
  3. 3.Division of GastroenterologyNorth Shore University HospitalManhasset

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