Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 39, Issue 3, pp 561–564 | Cite as

Long-term follow-up of children with chronic idiopathic constipation

  • Annamaria Staiano
  • Maria Rosaria Andreotti
  • Luigi Greco
  • Paola Basile
  • Salvatore Auricchio
Original Articles

Abstract

To determine the outcome of chronic idiopathic constipation, we followed 62 children with chronic idiopathic constipation (mean age: 5.2±2.8 years) for a period of five years. Each child received the same initial treatment over a 12-week period and was then followed every three months. After five years from diagnosis, chronic idiopathic constipation persisted in 52% of the children; 47% who remained symptomatic were >10 years old at the time of the five-year evaluation. Of the 27 who were constipated in the first year of life, 63% remained constipated after five years. Children who recovered within the five-year interval were significantly different from those that remained symptomatic in age of onset of constipation (P<0.05) and family history of constipation (P<0.05). After five years, both severity of abdominal pain and degree of soiling significantly decreased in both the recovered and unrecovered groups (P<0.05). This study suggests that chronic idiopathic constipation persists for ≥5 years in at least half of children. Early age of onset and family history of constipation are predictive of persistence. Abdominal pain and soiling improve in long-term follow-up irrespective of constipation outcome.

Key words

chronic idiopathic constipation abdominal pain soiling 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Annamaria Staiano
    • 1
  • Maria Rosaria Andreotti
    • 1
  • Luigi Greco
    • 1
  • Paola Basile
    • 1
  • Salvatore Auricchio
    • 1
  1. 1.From the Department of Pediatrics, II School of MedicineUniversity of NaplesNaplesItaly

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