Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 41, Issue 8, pp 1604–1614 | Cite as

Beneficial effect of a novel pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on gastric lesions induced by restraint stress, ethanol, indomethacin, and capsaicin neurotoxicity

  • Predrag Sikirić
  • Sven Seiwerth
  • Željko Grabarević
  • Rudolf Ručman
  • Marijan Petek
  • Vjekoslav Jagić
  • Branko Turković
  • Ivo Rotkvić
  • Stjepan Miše
  • Ivan Zoričić
  • Miroslav Gjurašin
  • Paško Konjevoda
  • Jadranka Šeparović
  • Danica Ljubanović
  • Branka Artuković
  • Mirna Bratulić
  • Marina Tišljar
  • Ljubica Jurina
  • Gojko Buljat
  • Pavao Miklić
  • Anton Marović
Esophageal, Gastric, And Duodenal Disorders

Abstract

Very recently, the integrity of capsaicin somatosensory neurons and their protection were suggested to be related to the activity in nociception of a newly discovered 15-amino acid peptide, BPC 157, shown to have strong beneficial effect on intestinal and liver lesions. Therefore, from this viewpoint, we have studied the gastroprotective effect of the pentadecapeptide BPC 157, on gastric lesions produced in rats by 96% ethanol, restraint stress, and indomethacin. The possible involvement of sensory neurons in the salutary actions of BPC 157 (10µg/kg, 10 ng/kg intraperitoneally) was studied with capsaicin, which has differential effects on sensory neurons: a high dose in adult (125 mg/kg subcutaneously, 3 months old) or administration (50 mg/kg subcutaneously) to neonatal animals (age of the 7 days) destroys sensory fibers, whereas a low dose (500µg/kg intraperitoneally) activates neurotransmitter release and protective effects on the mucosa. In the absence of capsaicin, BPC 157 protected gastric mucosa against ethanol, restraint, and indomethacin application. In the presence of neurotoxic doses of capsaicin, the negative influence of capsaicin on restraint, ethanol, or indomethacin lesions consistently affected salutary activity of BPC 157. However, BPC 157 protection was still evident in the capsaicin-treated rats (either treated as adults or as newborns) in all of these assays. Interestingly, after neonatal capsaicin treatment, a complete abolition of BPC gastroprotection was noted if BPC 157 was applied as a single nanogram-regimen, but the mucosal protection was fully reversed when the same dose was used daily. In line with the excitatory dose of capsaicin the beneficial effectiveness of BPC 157 appears to be increased as well. Taken together, these data provide evidence for complex synergistic interaction between the beneficial effectiveness of BPC 157 and peptidergic sensory afferent neuron activity.

Key words

pentadecapeptide BPC 157 organoprotective peptide gastric lesions capsaicin neurotoxicity rats gastroprotection neuroprotection 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Predrag Sikirić
    • 1
  • Sven Seiwerth
    • 1
  • Željko Grabarević
    • 1
  • Rudolf Ručman
    • 1
  • Marijan Petek
    • 1
  • Vjekoslav Jagić
    • 1
  • Branko Turković
    • 1
  • Ivo Rotkvić
    • 1
  • Stjepan Miše
    • 1
  • Ivan Zoričić
    • 1
  • Miroslav Gjurašin
    • 1
  • Paško Konjevoda
    • 1
  • Jadranka Šeparović
    • 1
  • Danica Ljubanović
    • 1
  • Branka Artuković
    • 1
  • Mirna Bratulić
    • 1
  • Marina Tišljar
    • 1
  • Ljubica Jurina
    • 1
  • Gojko Buljat
    • 1
  • Pavao Miklić
    • 1
  • Anton Marović
    • 1
  1. 1.From the Center for Digestive Diseases, Medical and Veterinary FacultyUniversity of ZagrebZagrebCroatia
  2. 2.Department of Pharmacology Medical FacultyUniversity of ZagrebZagrebRepublic of Croatia

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