European Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 154, Issue 8, pp 621–623 | Cite as

Complications of percutaneous liver biopsy in infants and children

  • A. Lachaux
  • C. Le Gall
  • M. Chambon
  • F. Regnier
  • I. Loras-Duclaux
  • R. Bouvier
  • M. Pinzaru
  • D. Stamm
  • M. Hermier
Original Paper

Abstract

Abstract

In this study, 144 consecutive percutaneous liver biopsies performed with a 1.6 mm Menghini needle, during a 2-year period were reviewed. All the children were aged under 15 years, 57 patients less than 1 year and 87 more than 1 year. All biopsies were adequate and the mean number of portal tracts examined was 17.6 per biopsy (14.3 in patients weighing less than 10 kg and 19.1 in the others). There were no deaths and we observed only bleeding complications. In patients with normal coagulation (128 cases), 1 bleeding requiring transfusion occurred; and in patients with abnormal coagulation (16 cases), we observed 2 bleeding cases requiring transfusion.

Conclusion

Percutaneous liver biopsy can be performed with 1.6 mm needles in children. For increased safety, ultrasound-guided biopsies are recommended.

Key words

Percutaneous Liver Biopsy Children 

Abbreviation

PLB

Percutaneous liver biopsy

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Lachaux
    • 1
  • C. Le Gall
    • 1
  • M. Chambon
    • 1
  • F. Regnier
    • 1
  • I. Loras-Duclaux
    • 1
  • R. Bouvier
    • 2
  • M. Pinzaru
    • 1
  • D. Stamm
    • 3
  • M. Hermier
    • 1
  1. 1.Service d'Hépatogastroentérologie et Nutrition PédiatriquesPavillon S-Hôpital Edouard HerriotLyon Cedex 03France
  2. 2.Service d'Anatomie PathologiqueHôpital Edouard HerriotLyon Cedex 03France
  3. 3.Service de Réanimation PédiatriqueHôpital Edouard HerriotLyon Cedex 03France

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