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Nitrate and phosphate uptake kinetics ofChattonella antiqua grown in light/dark cycles

  • Yasuo Nakamura
  • Makoto M. Watanabe
Article

Abstract

Nitrate and phosphate uptake kinetics ofChattonella antiqua were examined under light and dark conditions. The uptake kinetics ofC. antiqua followed the Michaelis-Menten equation. The maximal uptake rates (Vmax) of nitrate and phosphate in the dark were 86 and 93% of those in the light, respectively. The half-saturation constants (K 8 ) were not significantly affected by illumination and were comparable to those of other phytoplankton. However, specific maximal uptake rates ofC. antiqua for these substrates were much smaller than those of other phytoplankton.

Keywords

Phosphate Nitrate Phytoplankton Uptake Rate Dark Condition 
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Copyright information

© the Oceanographical Society of Japan 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yasuo Nakamura
    • 1
  • Makoto M. Watanabe
    • 1
  1. 1.Water and Soil Environment Divisionthe National Institute for Environmental StudiesIbarakiJapan

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