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Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 40, Issue 4, pp 853–858 | Cite as

In Vitro free radical production in rat esophageal mucosa induced by nicotine

  • Gerold J. Wetscher
  • Debasis Bagchi
  • Galen Perdikis
  • Manashi Bagchi
  • Elizabeth J. Redmond
  • Paul R. Hinder
  • Karl Glaser
  • Ronald A. Hinder
Esophageal, Gastric, And Duodenal Disorders

Abstract

Oxidative stress induced by nicotine was investigated in the esophageal mucosa of rats. The homogenized mucosa was incubated for 30 min with 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 ng/mg protein/ml nicotine or with 200 ng/mg protein/ml nicotine for 15, 30, 45, and 60 min. Esophageal mucosa was also incubated for 30 min with 200 ng/mg protein/ml nicotine with or without the scavengers superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, SOD + catalase, inactivated SOD, inactivated catalase, or albumin. Incubation with 0.9% NaCl served as control. There was a strong correlation between chemiluminescence and the nicotine dose (r=0.75) or the nicotine incubation time (r=0.77). Thirty-minute incubation of the esophageal mucosa with 200 ng/mg protein/ml nicotine increased chemiluminescence 5.5-fold and lipid peroxidation 3.3-fold. This response was dampened by SOD or catalase and abolished by SOD + catalase. Inactivated enzymes or albumin had no scavenging effect. These results demonstrate that nicotine causes oxidative stress to the esophageal mucosa.

Key words

nicotine free radicals esophagus 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerold J. Wetscher
    • 1
  • Debasis Bagchi
    • 1
  • Galen Perdikis
    • 1
  • Manashi Bagchi
    • 1
  • Elizabeth J. Redmond
    • 1
  • Paul R. Hinder
    • 1
  • Karl Glaser
    • 1
  • Ronald A. Hinder
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Medicine, Department of SurgeryCreighton UniversityOmaha

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