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Pediatric Radiology

, Volume 22, Issue 4, pp 287–289 | Cite as

Fluoroscopic placement of jejunal feeding tubes

  • F. Hoffer
  • R. H. Sandler
  • L. C. Kaplan
  • V. S. Mandell
  • M. Haynie
  • A. Leichner
Originals

Abstract

Over a two-and-one-half year period, 50 children underwent placements of jejunal tubes through a nasal route (NJ,n=47) or through an existing gastrostomy site (GJ,n=119). There were four attempted placements (98% success rate). The NJ tubes remained in place an average of 13 days, and the GJ tubes remained in place an average of 37 days. Fluoroscopic time for placement of an NJ tube averaged 6 min (29 cases), and for a GJ tube 8 minutes (91 cases). In spite of the limited retention time, fluoroscopic time, and availability of alternative methods, fluoroscopically placed jejunal feeding tubes are still playing an active role in this institution.

Keywords

Public Health Success Rate Retention Time Active Role Feeding Tube 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Hoffer
    • 1
  • R. H. Sandler
    • 2
  • L. C. Kaplan
    • 3
  • V. S. Mandell
    • 1
  • M. Haynie
    • 3
  • A. Leichner
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyChildren's Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Divisions of Gastroenterology and NutritionChildren's Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  3. 3.Birth Defects of the Department of MedicineChildren's Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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