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Pediatric Radiology

, Volume 22, Issue 8, pp 603–606 | Cite as

Bronchiectasis in children with lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia and acquired immune deficiency syndrome

Plain film and CT observations
  • J. K. Amorosa
  • R. W. Miller
  • L. Laraya-Cuasay
  • S. Gaur
  • R. Marone
  • L. Frenkel
  • J. L. Nosher
HIV Case Book

Abstract

In a review of 77 HIV positive children seen between 1981 and 1990, 32 were diagnosed as having lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis). Four of the LIP group developed bronchiectasis, a finding not previously reported. The precise factors leading to the bronchiectasis are unclear. All patients had chronically consolidated lung with volume loss. A history of recurrent bacterial superinfection was not noted in any of the cases. With more cases of HIV positive children living longer, bronchiectasis, long known to occur in primary immunologic disorders, will probably be more frequently noted.

Keywords

Public Health Pneumonia Volume Loss Bronchiectasis Immune Deficiency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. K. Amorosa
    • 1
  • R. W. Miller
    • 1
  • L. Laraya-Cuasay
    • 2
  • S. Gaur
    • 2
  • R. Marone
    • 2
  • L. Frenkel
    • 2
  • J. L. Nosher
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyUMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolNew BrunswickUSA
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsUMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolNew BrunswickUSA

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