European Journal of Clinical Microbiology

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 451–455 | Cite as

Ability of newer beta-lactam antibiotics to induce beta-lactamase production inEnterobacter cloacae

  • R. L. Then
Articles Current Topic Inducible Beta-Lactamases: Enzymes of Increasing Clinical Importance

Abstract

The beta-lactamase inducing properties of various new beta-lactam antibiotics in two isogenic strains ofEnterobacter cloacae were investigated. Beta-lactamase activity was measured two hours after addition of inducer to cells in the late logarithmic growth-phase. Beta-lactamase expression was highly dependent on the growth medium used, highest levels being obtained after induction with cefoxitin in Tryptic Soy broth, Mueller-Hinton broth and Nutrient broth. Upon induction the mutant 908 Ssi produced tenfold higher beta-lactamase levels than its parent wild type 908 Swi. Among the new antibiotics investigated, sulfoxides of several oxyimino-cephalosporins, HR 810, cefetamet, cefteram, carumonam and BRL 36650 were moderate or poor inducers. The penem FCE 22101 resembled imipenem in its strong inducing properties.

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Copyright information

© Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn Verlagsgesellschaft mbH 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. L. Then
    • 1
  1. 1.Pharmaceutical Research DivisionF. Hoffmann-La Roche & Co. Ltd.BaselSwitzerland

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