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Agents and Actions

, Volume 33, Issue 1–2, pp 147–149 | Cite as

Effects of selective histamine H3-receptor ligands on prolactin and growth hormone secretion in the rat

  • C. Netti
  • F. Guidobono
  • V. Sibilia
  • F. Pagani
  • I. Villa
  • A. Pecile
Histamine and the Nervous System

Abstract

The effects of intracarotid (i.a.) administration of the histamine (HA) H3-receptor agonist (R)-α-methyl-histamine (αMeHA) and of the H3-antagonist thioperamide, (THIO) on basal or morphine (M)-induced prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH) secretion were studied in male rats. M was administered 3 h after the H3-drugs. Neither THIO (2.5 mg/kg) nor αMeHA (10 mg/kg) changed basal PRL levels and only THIO enhanced the PRL-releasing effect of M (6 mg/kg). Basal GH secretion was not modified by THIO. αMeHA slightly increased GH secretion. THIO significantly decreased M-stimulated GH secretion (1 mg/kg, i.a.) and αMeHA slightly increased it. These results, in agreement with previous evidence obtained after central HA administration, indicate that endogenous brain HA facilitates PRL and inhibits GH secretion.

Keywords

Growth Hormone Morphine Histamine Prolactin Thio 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Netti
    • 1
  • F. Guidobono
    • 1
  • V. Sibilia
    • 1
  • F. Pagani
    • 1
  • I. Villa
    • 1
  • A. Pecile
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology, Chemotherapy and Medical ToxicologyUniversity of MilanMilanItaly

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