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Isolation ofEnterobacter aerogenes susceptible to beta-lactam antibiotics despite high level beta-lactamase production

  • M. A. Mellencamp
  • J. S. Roccaforte
  • L. C. Preheim
  • C. C. Sanders
  • C. A. Anene
  • M. J. Bittner
Notes

Abstract

This report describes a patient with nosocomial meningitis from whom four distinct isolates ofEnterobacter aerogenes were recovered over a complicated course of chemotherapy. The initial isolate was susceptible to expanded spectrum β-lactams despite constitutive production of high levels of β-lactamase. Resistant isolates recovered during antibiotic therapy had lost a 42,000 outer membrane protein. These data suggest that b-lactam susceptibility in the original isolate was due to “hyperpermeability” mediated by the 42,000 Dalton protein.

Keywords

Internal Medicine Membrane Protein Meningitis Antibiotic Therapy Outer Membrane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn Verlagsgesellschaft mbH 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. A. Mellencamp
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. S. Roccaforte
    • 2
    • 3
  • L. C. Preheim
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • C. C. Sanders
    • 2
  • C. A. Anene
    • 4
  • M. J. Bittner
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Veterans Administration Medical CenterSection of Infectious DiseasesOmahaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Medical MicrobiologyCreighton UniversityOmahaUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineCreighton UniversityOmahaUSA
  4. 4.Department of Surgery, School of MedicineCreighton UniversityOmahaUSA

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