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Possible non-sexual transmission of genital human papillomavirus infections in young women

  • C. C. Pao
  • P. L. Tsai
  • Y. L. Chang
  • T. T. Hsieh
  • J. Y. Jin
Notes

Abstract

Human papillomaviruses were detected by an in vitro enzymatic DNA amplification method in cells obtained from vulvar swabs of 9 of 61 (14.8 %) young women without prior experience of sexual intercourse and in 7 of 57 (12.3 %) young women with prior experience. The prevalence of human papillomavirus DNA in these two groups of women was not significantly different (x2=0.16, p>0.5; 95 % confidence interval −0.165 to 0.215). These results suggest that genital human papillomavirus is not sexually transmitted in all cases and that it may be acquired by modes other than sexual contact.

Keywords

Internal Medicine Young Woman Sexual Intercourse Prior Experience Sexual Contact 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn Verlagsgesellschaft mbH 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. C. Pao
    • 1
  • P. L. Tsai
    • 1
  • Y. L. Chang
    • 1
  • T. T. Hsieh
    • 2
  • J. Y. Jin
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryChang Gung Medical CollegeTao YuanTaiwan, China
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyChang Gung Medical College and Memorial HospitalTaipeiTaiwan, China
  3. 3.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyBeijing Friendship HospitalBeijingPeoples Republic of China

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