Economics and energetics of organic and conventional farming

  • David Pimentel
Article

Abstract

The use of organic farming technologies has certain advantages in some situations and for certain crops such as maize; however, with other crops such as vegetables and fruits, yields under organic production may be substantially reduced compared with conventional production. In most cases, the use of organic technologies requires higher labor inputs than conventional technologies. Some major advantages of organic production are the conservation of soil and water resources and the effective recycling of livestock wastes when they are available.

Keywords

Agriculture organic energy economics environment 

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Copyright information

© Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Pimentel
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Agriculture and Life SciencesCornell UniversityIthaca

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