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Pharmaceutisch Weekblad

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 1–6 | Cite as

Stability of corticosteroids under anaerobic conditions

VII. 17a-hydroxy-17a-hydroxymethyl-17-keto-D-homosteroid phosphate
  • J. H. Beijnen
  • D. Dekker
Original Articles

Abstract

The major decomposition product of prednisolone phosphate formed under anaerobic decomposition conditions in aqueous solution at pH=8.3 is identified as 17a-hydroxy-17a-hydroxymethyl-17-keto-D-homosteroid phosphate. The chromatographic properties, the isolation and the structure elucidation of both the D-homosteroid phosphate and its specific dephosphorylated analogue are given. Finally a mechanism leading to the D-homosteroid phosphate is postulated.

Keywords

Public Health Phosphate Aqueous Solution Internal Medicine Corticosteroid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Royal Dutch Association for Advancement of Pharmacy 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. H. Beijnen
    • 1
  • D. Dekker
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Analytical Pharmacy, Faculty of PharmacyState University of UtrechtGH UtrechtThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Servier Nederland BVNN ZoetermeerThe Netherlands

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