Experientia

, Volume 42, Issue 6, pp 611–613 | Cite as

Methyllycaconitine, a naturally occurring insecticide with a high affinity for the insect cholinergic receptor

  • K. R. Jennings
  • D. G. Brown
  • D. P. WrightJr
Short Communications

Summary

Studies of extracts ofDelphinium seeds, long known to be insecticidal, revealed that a principal insecticidal toxin was methyllycaconitine, which is shown to be a potent inhibitor of α-bungarotoxin binding to housefly heads (Kinh=2.5×10−10±0.5×10−10M).

Key words

Insecticide nicotinic receptor methyllycaconitine Delphinium alkaloids 

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References

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    Satelle, D.B., Harrow, I.D., and Hue, B., in: Receptors for Neurotransmitters, Hormones and Pheromones in Insects, p. 125. Eds D.B. Satelle L.M. Hall and J.G. Hildebrand. Elsevier, Amsterdam 1981.Google Scholar
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    Benn, M.H., and Jacyno, J.M., in: Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives, Vol. 1, p. 153. Ed. S.W. Pelletier J. Wiley & Sons, New York 1983.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. R. Jennings
    • 1
  • D. G. Brown
    • 1
  • D. P. WrightJr
    • 1
  1. 1.Agricultural Research DivisionAmerican Cyanamid Co.PrincetonUSA

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