Experientia

, Volume 49, Issue 6–7, pp 497–502 | Cite as

The triangular halophilic archaebacteriumHaloarcula japonica strain TR-1

  • K. Horikoshi
  • R. Aono
  • S. Nakamura
Multi-Author Reviews Biology of Halophilic Bacteria, Part I

Abstract

We have isolated a predominantly triangular disc-shaped halophilic archaebacterium, strain TR-1, from a Japanese saltern soil. The taxonomical characteristics of this strain led us to propose a new speciesHaloarcula japonica. The cell division ofHa. japonica strain TR-1 was analyzed by time lapse microscopic cinematography. Cell plates were laid down asymmetrically, generating triangular or rhombic daughter cells which then separated. We have demonstrated the occurrence of a glycoprotein with an apparent molecular mass of 170 kDa on the cell surface ofHa. japonica. The release of this cell surface glycoprotein (CSG), accompanied by a morphological change (triangular to spherical), was observed after lowering the magnesium concentration in the medium. Thus, it is likely that the CSG plays an important role in maintaining the characteristic shape ofHa. japonica.

Key words

Triangular bacterium Haloarcula japonica cell division surface layer cell surface glycoprotein cell morphology 

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag Basel 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Horikoshi
    • 1
  • R. Aono
    • 1
  • S. Nakamura
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Bioengineering, Faculty of Bioscience and BiotechnologyTokyo Institute of TechnologyYokohama(Japan)

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