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Experientia

, Volume 34, Issue 8, pp 964–969 | Cite as

Work in progress at the Shanghai institute of Physiology, Division of Acupuncture

  • Silvio Weidmann
Generalia

Keywords

Shanghai Institute 
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References

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    Acupuncture Anesthesia Group, Shanghai Institute of Physiology, Electrical response to nocuous stimulation and its inhibition in nucleus centralis lateralis of thalamus in rabbits, Chin. med. J., p. 31 (1973) (Chinese).Google Scholar
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    Acupuncture Research Group, Shanghai Institute of Physiology, Observations on activity of some deep receptors in cat hindlimb during acupuncture. Kexue Tongbao18, 184 (1973) (Chinese).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Silvio Weidmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of BerneBerne(Switzerland)

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