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Personal Technologies

, Volume 2, Issue 4, pp 221–230 | Cite as

Mobile pen-based technologies for drivers licence administration

  • Ying K Leung
  • Kon Mouzakis
  • Chris Pilgrim
Article
  • 33 Downloads

Abstract

One of the major advantages of mobile computing devices is that they facilitate data capture when the operator is on the move. The data collected can be readily processed for analysis and reporting purposes, without the need for manually transcribing the data into an electronic form. This paper describes the design and development of two prototypical systems using mobile pen-based technologies for the administration of learner drivers licence testing. We highlight some of the design issues and report the lessons learned.

Keywords

Drivers licence administration Mobile devices Pen-based devices Pen-based system applications 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Advanced Technologies Group, School of Information TechnologySwinburne University of TechnologyHawthornAustralia

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