European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 102, Issue 3, pp 305–310

A carlavirus-specific PCR primer and partial nucleotide sequence provides further evidence for the recognition of cowpea mild mottle virus as a whitefly-transmitted carlavirus

  • J. Badge
  • A. Brunt
  • R. Carson
  • E. Dagless
  • M. Karamagioli
  • S. Phillips
  • S. Seal
  • R. Turner
  • G. D. Foster
Short Communication

Abstract

Cowpea mild mottle virus (CMMV) has physicochemical properties typical of carlaviruses, but has remained unclassified due to a number of unusual properties, including no serological cross-reaction with 18 carlaviruses; production of brush-like inclusion bodiesin vivo; and the ability to be transmitted by whiteflies (Bermisia tabaci). In this paper we report the use of a carlavirus specific PCR primer to identify CMMV as a member of the carlavirus group. This is confirmed by nucleotide sequence (958 nucleotides) from the 3′ terminal region of CMMV RNA which contains a partial open reading frame (ORF) having high similarity with the coat proteins of other carlaviruses. The sequence also contains an 11.7K ORF at the 3′ terminus, containing a ‘zinc-finger’ motif which is unique to carlaviruses.

Key words

carlavirus-specific primer CMMV nucleotide sequence PCR 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adams AN and Barbara DJ (1980) Host range, purification and some properties of hop mosaic virus. Annals of Applied Biology 96: 201–208Google Scholar
  2. Adams AN and Barbara DJ (1982) Host range, purification and some properties of two carlaviruses from hop (Humulus lupulus): hop latent and American hop latent. Annals of Applied Biology 101: 483–494Google Scholar
  3. Brunt AA, Atkey PT and Woods RD (1983) Intracellular occurrence of cowpea mild mottle virus in two unrelated plant species. Intervirology 20: 137–142PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Cavileer TD, Halpern BT, Lawrence DM, Podleckis EV, Martin RR and Hillman BI (1994) Nucleotide sequence of the carlavirus associated with blueberry scorch and similar diseases. Journal of General Virology 75: 711–720PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Foster GD (1992) The structure and expression of the genome of carlaviruses. Research in Virology 143: 103–112PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Foster GD and Mills PR (1992) The 3′-nucleotide sequence of an ordinary strain of potato virus S. Virus Genes 6: 213–220PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Foster GD, Millar AW, Meehan, BM and Mills PR (1990) Nucleotide sequence of the 3′-terminal region of Helenium virus SRNA. Journal of General Virology 71: 1877–1880PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Henderson J, Gibbs MJ, Edwards ML, Clarke VA, Gardener KA and Cooper JI (1992) Partial nucleotide sequence of poplar mosaic virus RNA confirms its classification as a carlavirus. Journal of General Virology 73: 1887–1890PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Jeyanandarajah P and Brunt AA (1993) The natural occurrence, transmission, properties and possible affinities of cowpea mild mottle virus. Journal of Phytopathology 137: 148–156Google Scholar
  10. Levay K and Zavriev S (1991) Nucleotide sequence and gene organ- isation of the 3′-terminal region of chrysanthemum virus B genomic RNA. Journal of General Virology 72: 2333–2337PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. MacKenzie DJ, Tremaine JH and Stace-Smith R (1989) Organisation and interviral homologies of the 3′-terminal portion of potato virus S RNA. Journal of General Virology 70: 1053–1063PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Meehan BM and Mills PR (1991) Nucleotide sequence of the 3′— terminal region of carnation latent virus. Intervirology 32: 262- 267PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Memelink J, van der Vlugt CIM, Linthorst, HJM, Derks AFLM, Asjes, CJ and Bol JF (1990). Homologies between the genomes of a carlavirus (lily symptomless virus) and a potexvirus (lily viras X) from lily plants. Journal of General Virology 71: 917- 924PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Pappu SS, Brand R, Pappu HR, Rybicki EP, Gough KH, Frenkel MJ and Niblett CL (1993). A polymerase chain reaction method adapted for selected amplification and cloning of 3′ sequences of potyviral genomes: application to Dasheen mosaic virus. Journal of Virological Methods 41: 9–20PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Shukla, DD, Ward CW and Brunt AA (1994) The Potyviridae. CAB International, Oxon, UKGoogle Scholar
  16. Zavriev SK, KanyukjaKV and Levay KE (1991) The genome organ- isation of potato virus M RNA. Journal of General Virology 72: 9–14PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Badge
    • 1
  • A. Brunt
    • 2
  • R. Carson
    • 1
  • E. Dagless
    • 1
  • M. Karamagioli
    • 3
  • S. Phillips
    • 2
  • S. Seal
    • 3
  • R. Turner
    • 1
  • G. D. Foster
    • 1
  1. 1.Botany DepartmentUniversity of LeicesterLeicesterUK
  2. 2.HRILittlehamptonUK
  3. 3.NRIChatham MaritimeUK

Personalised recommendations