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European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 102, Issue 7, pp 645–654 | Cite as

Components of resistance of cassava to African cassava mosaic virus

  • D. Fargette
  • L. T. Colon
  • R. Bouveau
  • C. Fauquet
Research Articles

Abstract

Components of resistance of cassava (Manihot esculenta) to African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and their interrelationships were confirmed and quantified in a series of experiments at Adiopodoumé (Ivory Coast, West-Africa). The response to virus infection and toBemisia tabaci infestation of a large collection of cassava, including local cultivars and others derived from inter-specificM. glaziovii hybrids was assessed. A consistent correlation was found between virus titre, symptom intensity, disease incidence and non-systemicity (recovery) which suggests that they are different expressions of the same genetic resistance. By contrast, there was no correlation between whitefly infestation and incidence of ACMV, suggesting that resistance to virus and vector are determined by two distinct genetic mechanisms. Several improved cultivars derived from inter-crossing cassava withM. glaziovii as well as some local cultivars were highly resistant and combined low susceptibility, low symptom intensity, low virus content and high level of recovery. Although yield losses ranged from 10% to 30% in such resistant cultivars, the combined effect of high field resistance and high rate of recovery lead to low disease incidence and limited yield losses, even in areas of high infection pressure such as Adiopodoumé.

Key words

epidemiology geminivirus integrated pest management whitefly yield losses 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Fargette
    • 1
  • L. T. Colon
    • 1
  • R. Bouveau
    • 1
  • C. Fauquet
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de PhytovirologieORSTOM, AdiopodouméAbidjan, Ivory CoastAfrica

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