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European Journal of Plant Pathology

, Volume 102, Issue 6, pp 527–536 | Cite as

Properties of a citrus isolate of olive latent virus 1, a new necrovirus

  • G. P. Martelli
  • M. A. Yilmaz
  • V. Savino
  • S. Baloglu
  • F. Grieco
  • M. E. Güldür
  • N. Greco
  • R. Lafortezza
Research Articles

Abstract

A virus was recovered by sap transmission from plants of several citrus species exhibiting or not symptoms of chlorotic dwarf (CCD), a disease recently reported from Eastern Mediterranean Turkey. The virus was identified as an isolate of olive latent virus 1 (OLV-1), originally described as a possible sobemovirus. The citrus isolate of OLV-1 (OLV-1/Tk) possesses biological, morphological, physico-chemical, and ultrastructural properties similar, if not identical to those of the OLV-1 type strain and is also serologically indistinguishable from it. In addition, OLV-1/Tk has many properties, especially physico-chemical, in common with serotypes A and D of tobacco necrosis necrovirus (TNV-A and TNV-D). However, OLV-1/Tk is only very distantly related serologically to both TNV-A and D, suggesting that it can be regarded as a distinct species in the genusNecrovirus. OLV-1/Tk could not be detected in citrus tissues by ELIS A or dot-blot molecular hybridization, probably because of the extremely low virus concentration. By contrast, limited virus recovery was obtained by sap inoculation and fair detection rates were afforded by PCR. OLV-1/Tk was identified in 54 of 92 (59%) citrus plants affected by CCD and in 14 of 49 (28%) symptomless plants. These results do not support the notion that there is a cause-effect relationship between OLV-1/Tk and CCD, even though the more frequent association of this virus with diseased plants remains intriguing.

Key words

citrus chlorotic dwarf OLV-1 necrovirus virus purification physicochemical properties serology cytopathology dsRNA cDNA molecular probes PCR 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. P. Martelli
    • 1
  • M. A. Yilmaz
    • 2
  • V. Savino
    • 1
  • S. Baloglu
    • 2
  • F. Grieco
    • 1
  • M. E. Güldür
    • 2
  • N. Greco
    • 1
  • R. Lafortezza
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Protezione delle PianteUniversità degli Studi and Centro di Studio del CNR sui Virus e le Virosi delle Colture MediterraneeBariItaly
  2. 2.Department of Plant ProtectionUniversity of ÇukurovaAdanaTurkey

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