Advertisement

Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 97–114 | Cite as

Sexual identity: Conflict and confusion in a male adolescent

  • Randolph L. Lucente
Articles

Abstract

This paper presents a conceptual formulation, derived from developmental object relations theory and ego psychology, of the passage in male adolescence that culminates with the achievement of a masculine heterosexual identity. Themes of psychosexuality, male gender attributes, masculinity and object preference, and sexual orientation are discussed with reference to the adolescent stage. Finally, the critical tasks, core conflicts, and internalizations of prior developmental stages, as well as the integration that is required of adolescence proper relative to a sexual identity as heterosexual and masculine, are highlighted through an extensive case illustration of an adolescent male with sexual identity confusion.

Keywords

Sexual Orientation Male Gender Relation Theory Sexual Identity Conceptual Formulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Applegate, J. S. (1987). Beyond the dyad: Including the father in separation-individuation.Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, v. 4, #4, pp. 92–105.Google Scholar
  2. Becker, J. V. and Kavoussi, R. J. (1988). Sexual disorders. In Talbot, J., Hales, R., and Yudofsky, S., eds.Textbook of psychiatry. Washington, D. C.: American Psychiatric Press, pp. 587–603.Google Scholar
  3. Blanck, G. and Blanck, R. (1974).Ego psychology: Theory and practice. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Blanck, R. and Blanck, G. (1986).Beyond ego psychology: Developmental object relations theory. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Blos, P. (1962).On adolescence: A psychoanalytic interpretation. New York: Free Press of Glencoe.Google Scholar
  6. Blos, P. (1965). The initial stage of male adolescence.Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, v. 20, pp. 145–64.Google Scholar
  7. Blos, P. (1967). The second individuation process of adolescence.Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, v. 22, pp. 162–86. New York: International Universities Press.Google Scholar
  8. Blos, P. (1970).The young adolescent: Clinical studies. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  9. Blos, P. (1985).Son and father: Before and beyond the oedipus complex. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  10. Chodorow, N. (1989).Feminism and psychoanalytic theory. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 3rd edition, revised. Washington, D. C.: American Psychiatric Association.Google Scholar
  12. Ekstein, R. (1966).Children of time and space, of action and impulse. New York: Meredith Publishing Company.Google Scholar
  13. Erikson, E. H. (1959).Identity and the life cycle: Selected papers v. 1, #1Google Scholar
  14. Erikson, E. H. (1963).Childhood and society. New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  15. Erikson, E. H. (1968).Identity: Youth and crisis. New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  16. Freud, A. (1946).The ego and the mechanisms of defence. New York: International Universities Press.Google Scholar
  17. Freud, A. (1958). Adolescence.Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, v. 13, pp. 255–78. New York: International Universities Press.Google Scholar
  18. Freud, S. (1905). Three essays on the theory of sexuality.Standard edition, v. 7, pp. 3–243. London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  19. Freud, S. (1923). Psychoanalysis and libido theory.Standard Edition, v. 18, p. 237. London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  20. Freud, S. (1923). The ego and the id.Standard edition, v. 19, pp. 3–59. London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  21. Freud, S. (1924). The passing of the oedipus complex.Standard edition, v. 19, pp. 172–79. London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  22. Freud, S. (1925). Some psychological consequences of the anatomical distinction between the sexes.Standard Edition, v. 19, pp. 243–58. London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  23. Gabbard, G. O. (1994). The theoretical basis of dynamic psychiatry, chapter 2, pp. 29–64.Psychodynamic psychiatry in clinical practice. Washington, D. C.: American Psychiatric Press.Google Scholar
  24. Gilligan, C. (1982). New maps of development, new visions of maturity.American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, v. 52, #2, pp. 192–212.Google Scholar
  25. Hartmann, H. (1939).Ego psychology and the problem of adaptation. New York: International Universities Press.Google Scholar
  26. Hussey, D. L., Strom, G., and Singer, M. Male victims of sexual abuse: An analysis of adolescent psychiatric inpatients.Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, v. 9, #6, pp. 491–505.Google Scholar
  27. Jaques, E. (1980). The midlife crisis.The course of life, v. 3, pp. 1–23. Greenspan, S. I. and Pollock, G. E. eds. Washington, D. C.: USDHHS.Google Scholar
  28. Jordan, J. V., Kaplan, A. G., Miller, J. B., Stives, I. P., and Surrey, J. L. (1991).Women's growth in connection: Writings from the Stowe Center. New York: The Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  29. Kernberg, O. (1976).Object relations theory and clinical psychoanalysis. New York: Jason Aronson.Google Scholar
  30. Kernberg, O. (1980).Internal world and external reality: Object relations theory applied. New York: Jason Aronson.Google Scholar
  31. Kestenberg, J. S. (1980). Eleven, twelve, and thirteen: Years of transition from barrenness of childhood to the fertility of adolescence.Course of life, v. 2, pp. 229–64. Greenspan, S. I. and Pollock, G. E., eds. Washington, D. C.: USDHHS.Google Scholar
  32. Kohlberg, L. (1976). Moral stages and moralization: The cognitive-developmental approach. In Lickona, T. ed.Moral development and behavior: Theory, research, and social issues. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, pp. 31–53.Google Scholar
  33. Kohut, H. (1971).The analysis of the self. New York: International Universities Press.Google Scholar
  34. Laufer, M. (1968). The body image, the function of masturbation, and adolescence: Problems of ownership of the body.Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, v. 23, pp. 114–37. New York: International Universities Press.Google Scholar
  35. Lucente, R. L. (1986). Self-transcending and the adolescent ego ideal.Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, v. 3, #3, pp. 161–76.Google Scholar
  36. Lucente, R. L. (1994). The concept of developmental lines in marital therapy.Journal of Analytic Social Work, v. 2, #2, pp. 57–75.Google Scholar
  37. Mahler, M., Pine, F., and Bergman, A.The psychological birth of the human infant. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  38. Masterson, J. F. (1972).Treatment of the borderline adolescent: A developmental approach. New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.Google Scholar
  39. Meers, D. R. (1992). Sexual identity in the ghetto.Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, v. 9, #2, pp. 99–116.Google Scholar
  40. Mishne, J. M. (1986).Clinical work with adolescents. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  41. Money, J. (1974). Intersexual and transexual behavior and syndromes. In Arieti, S.American handbook of psychiatry, 2nd ed., pp. 334–51. New York: Basic Books, Inc.Google Scholar
  42. Palombo, J. (1988). Adolescent development: A view from self psychology.Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, v. 5, #3, pp. 171–86.Google Scholar
  43. Palombo, J. (1994). Gender as a theme in self-narratives.Journal of Analytic Social Work, v. 2, #2, pp. 3–24.Google Scholar
  44. Piaget, J. (1965).The moral development of the child. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  45. Reiter, L. (1989). Sexual orientation, sexual identity, and the question of choice.Clinical Social Work Journal, v. 17, #2, pp. 138–50.Google Scholar
  46. Schactel, Z. (1986). The ‘impossible profession’ considered from a gender perspective. In Alpert, J. L., ed.Psychoanalysis and women: contemporary reappraisals. Hillsdale, N. J.: The Analytic Press.Google Scholar
  47. Schafer, R. (1968).Aspects of internalization. New York: International Universities Press.Google Scholar
  48. Scher, M. (1990). Effect of gender role incongruities on men: Experience as clients in psychotherapy.Psychotherapy, v. 27, pp. 322–26.Google Scholar
  49. Schwartz, M. (1994). Negative impact of sexual abuse on adult male gender: Issues and strategies of intervention.Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, v. 11, #3, pp. 179–94.Google Scholar
  50. Silbar, S. and Palombo, J. (1991). A discordant consolidation of self in a late adolescent male.Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, v. 8, #1, pp. 17–32.Google Scholar
  51. Sklansky, M. (1980). The pubescent years: Eleven to fourteen. In S. I. Greenspan and G. E. Pollock, eds.The course of life, v. II. pp. 265–92. Washington, D. C.: USDHHS.Google Scholar
  52. Stoller, R. (1968).Sex and gender: On the development of masculinity and femininity. New York: Science House.Google Scholar
  53. Sullivan, T. and Schneider, M. (1987). Development and identity issues in adolescent homosexuality.Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, v. 4, #1, 13–24.Google Scholar
  54. Wolf, E. (1982). Adolescence: Psychology of the self and selfobjects. In Feinstein, S. and Giovacchini, P., eds.Adolescent Psychiatry, v. 10, pp. 171–81.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Randolph L. Lucente
    • 1
  1. 1.the Doctoral Program, School of Social WorkLoyola University ChicagoChicago

Personalised recommendations