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Pharmacy World and Science

, Volume 17, Issue 4, pp 103–112 | Cite as

Traditional Chinese herbal medicine

  • You-Ping Zhu
  • Herman J. Woerdenbag
Reviews

Abstract

Herbal medicine, acupuncture and moxibustion, and massage are the three major constituent parts of traditional Chinese medicine. Although acupuncture is well known in many Western countries, Chinese herbal medicine, the most important part of traditional Chinese medicine, is less well known in the West. This article gives a brief introduction to the written history, theory, and teaching of Chinese herbal medicine in China. It also describes modern scientific research into and the quality control of Chinese herbal medicines in China. Some examples of how new drugs derived from Chinese herbs have been developed on the basis of traditional therapeutic experience are presented. Finally, the situation of Chinese herbal medicine in the West is discussed.

Keywords

Books Drug screening Drugs, Chinese herbal Education History of medicine Medicine, Chinese traditional Pharmacology Quality control Research 

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Copyright information

© Royal Dutch Association for Advancement of Pharmacy 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • You-Ping Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Herman J. Woerdenbag
    • 3
  1. 1.Foundation Hwa To CentreUniversity of GroningenAV Groningenthe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of PharmacySecond Military Medical UniversityShanghaiPeople's Republic of China
  3. 3.Department of Pharmaceutical BiologyUniversity Centre for Pharmacy, University of GroningenAW Groningenthe Netherlands

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