The Journal of Membrane Biology

, Volume 57, Issue 3, pp 235–241

Electrophysiologic changes associated with potassium depletion of frog skin

  • Wolfram Nagel
  • Mary Beth Pope
  • Kim Peterson
  • Mortimer M. Civan
Articles

DOI: 10.1007/BF01869591

Cite this article as:
Nagel, W., Pope, M.B., Peterson, K. et al. J. Membrain Biol. (1980) 57: 235. doi:10.1007/BF01869591

Summary

Skins from the frogRana pipiens pipiens were studied under short-circuited conditions during the course of removing and replacing potassium in the inner bathing media in 14 experiments. The intracellular potential (VSC), fractional resistance (FR), short-circuit current (ISC) and total tissue conductance (gT) were constantly monitored during impalements of the epithelial cells. The mean value (±se) forVSC was −79 (±3) mV under baseline conditions. Removal of potassium from the inner bathing solution transiently stimulated the short-circuit current and hyperpolarized the basolateral membrane; with sufficiently long incubations, the basolateral membrane was eventually depolarized. Restoration of potassium to the inner solution within 43 min after initiating the perfusion with K+-free solution depolarized the basolateral membrane. However, restoration of potassium after at least 11/2 hr of incubation hyperpolarized the membrane. Ouabain consistently depolarized the basolateral membrane, even after extended periods of potassium depletion as long as 320 min. In the presence of ouabain, restoration of potassium depolarized the basolateral membrane. The data provide further evidence for the concept that the Na−K exchange pump of frog skin is rheogenic. Furthermore, the results suggest that the pump continues to be active even during prolonged periods of potassium depletion, reaccumulating potassium which has leaked out of the epithelial cells.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wolfram Nagel
    • 1
  • Mary Beth Pope
    • 1
  • Kim Peterson
    • 1
  • Mortimer M. Civan
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Physiology and MedicineUniversity of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphia
  2. 2.Physiologisches Institut der Universität MünchenMunich 2German Federal republic

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