Environmental Management

, Volume 3, Issue 1, pp 41–50 | Cite as

Predicting the multiple pathways of plant succession

  • Peter J. Cattelino
  • Ian R. Noble
  • Ralph O. Slatyer
  • Stephen R. Kessell
Research

Abstract

Classical concepts view succession as a deterministic, mechanistic regeneration of the disturbed community, and thus have limited applicability to fire-prone ecosystems, A recently developed multiple pathway succession model appears to have more realism and applicability in frequently disturbed ecosystems. It includes a set of species-specific attributes that are vital to reproduction and survival, and permits variable succession pathways depending on the stand's age (and thus species composition) when disturbed. Examples from Australia and the northern Rocky Mountains (USA) are presented, as are approaches to refining and improving the model.

Key words

Plant succession Fire effects modeling Mediterranean Australia Montana Rocky Mountains Glacier National Park Eucalyptus Coniferous forests Fire frequency 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter J. Cattelino
    • 1
  • Ian R. Noble
    • 2
  • Ralph O. Slatyer
    • 2
  • Stephen R. Kessell
    • 1
  1. 1.Gradient Modeling, Inc.Missoula
  2. 2.Department of Environmental Biology Research School of Biological SciencesAustralian National UniversityCanberra CityAustralia

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