Advertisement

Springer Nature is making SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 research free. View research | View latest news | Sign up for updates

A cost analysis technique for research management and design

Abstract

A classic research approach is to optimize experimental design and available resources. However, that approach does not guarantee that results will be useful. This article takes the view that research should not be undertaken unless there is assurance that final results will be significant to a level specified before any work is begun. Given that assurance, the relationship between cost and statistical significance is explored, a new approach to optimization s developed, and the use of models in research design is considered.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

Literature cited

  1. Atkinson, A. C. 1982. Developments in the design of experiments.International Statistical Review 50:161–177.

  2. Cale, W. G., R. V. O'Neill, and R. H. Gardner. 1983a. Aggregation error in nonlinear ecological models.Journal of Theoretical Biology 100:539–550.

  3. Cale, W. G., R. V. O'Neill, and H. H. Shugart. 1983b. Development and application of desirable ecological models.Ecological Modelling 18:171–186.

  4. Callahan, J. T. 1984. Long-term ecological research.Bio-Science 34:363–367.

  5. Federer, W. T. 1980. Some recent results in experiment design with a bibliography. I.International Statistical Review 48:357–368.

  6. Federer, W. T. 1981a. Some recent results in experiment design with a bibliography. II.International Statistical Review 49:95–108.

  7. Federer, W. T. 1981b. Some recent results in experiment design with a bibliography—part HI.International Statistical Review 49:185–197.

  8. Gardner, R. H., R. V. O'Neill, J. B. Mankin, and J. H. Carney. 1981. A comparison of sensitivity analysis and error analysis based on a stream ecosystem model.Ecological Modelling 12:177–194.

  9. Gardner, R. H., W. G. Cale, and R. V. O'Neill. 1982. Robust analysis of aggregation error.Ecology 63:1771–1779.

  10. Gould, P. 1970. IsStatistix inferens the geographical name for a wild goose?Economic Geography 46:439–448.

  11. Gray, J. T. 1982. Community structure and productivity inCeanothus chaparral and coastal sage scrub of southern California.Ecological Monographs 52:415–435.

  12. Jordan, C. F., J. R. Kline, and D. S. Sasscer. 1972. Relative stability of mineral cycles in forest ecosystems.American Naturalist 106:237–253.

  13. Snedecor, G. W., and W. G. Cochran. 1973. Statistical Methods. Iowa State University Press, Ames, Iowa. 593 pp.

  14. Stein, C. 1945. A two-sample test for a linear hypothesis whose power is independent of the variance.Annual Mathematics Statistics 16:243–258.

  15. Wiegert, R. G. 1962. The selection of an optimum quadrat size for sampling the standing crop of grasses and forbs.Ecology 43:125–129.

Download references

Author information

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Cale, W.G., McKown, M.P. A cost analysis technique for research management and design. Environmental Management 10, 89–96 (1986). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01866420

Download citation

Key words

  • Research cost
  • Research design
  • Statistical significance
  • Models
  • Optimization