Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 273–290 | Cite as

Evaluation of a home-based intervention program to reduce infant passive smoking and lower respiratory illness

  • Robert A. Greenberg
  • Victor J. Strecher
  • Karl E. Bauman
  • Barbara W. Boat
  • Mary Glenn Fowler
  • Lynette L. Keyes
  • Floyd W. Denny
  • Robert S. Chapman
  • Helen C. Stedman
  • Lisa M. LaVange
  • Lucinda H. Glover
  • Nancy J. Haley
  • Frank A. Loda
Article

Abstract

We conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine whether a home-based intervention program could reduce infant passive smoking and lower respiratory illness. The intervention consisted of four nurse home visits during the first 6 months of life, designed to assist families to reduce the infant's exposure to tobacco smoke. Among the 121 infants of smoking mothers who completed the study, there was a significant difference in trend over the year between the intervention and the control groups in the amount of exposure to tobacco smoke; infants in the intervention group were exposed to 5.9 fewer cigarettes per day at 12 months. There was no group difference in infant urine cotinine excretion. The prevalence of persistent lower respiratory symptoms was lower among intervention-group infants of smoking mothers whose head of household had no education beyond high school: intervention group, 14.6%; and controls, 34.0%.

Key Words

tobacco pollution infant intervention respiratory disease 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert A. Greenberg
    • 1
  • Victor J. Strecher
    • 1
  • Karl E. Bauman
    • 1
  • Barbara W. Boat
    • 1
  • Mary Glenn Fowler
    • 1
  • Lynette L. Keyes
    • 1
  • Floyd W. Denny
    • 1
  • Robert S. Chapman
    • 1
  • Helen C. Stedman
    • 1
  • Lisa M. LaVange
    • 1
  • Lucinda H. Glover
    • 1
  • Nancy J. Haley
    • 2
  • Frank A. Loda
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Community Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, School of MedicineUniversity of North CarolinaChapel Hill
  2. 2.The American Health FoundationValhalla

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