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Computers and the Humanities

, Volume 27, Issue 1, pp 41–47 | Cite as

A microworld approach to the formalization of musical knowledge

  • Henkjan Honing
Article

Abstract

This paper is about the importance of applying computational modeling and artificial intelligence techniques to music cognition and computer music research. The construction of microworlds as a methodology plays a key role in the different stages of this research. Several uses of microworlds are described. Microworlds have been criticized in the domains of artificial intelligence and the cognitive sciences, but this critique has to be seen in its proper context (i.e. in modeling of human intelligence, not as a methodology). It is shown that the microworld approach is still an important methodology in music cognition and computer music research, and a promising strategy in the design of a general representation formalism of musical knowledge.

Key Words

Artificial Intelligence and Music Microworlds Knowledge Representation Music Cognition Representation of Time and Temporal Structure 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henkjan Honing
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computational LinguisticsUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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