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, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp 112–121 | Cite as

Coherence and chaos in educational historiography

  • Chad Gaffield
Retrospect And Prospect

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Copyright information

© The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chad Gaffield
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of HistoryUniversity of OttawaCanada

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