Social-class inequality in infant mortality in England and Wales from 1921 to 1980

  • Elsie R. Pamuk
Articles

Abstract

This paper examines the trend in social inequality in infant mortality in England and Wales between 1921 and 1980, using both class- and occupation-specific data. It employs a summary measure of inequality that uses all of the available data and can be evaluated in terms of its sensitivity to errors using accepted diagnostic techniques. Occupations that played a significant role in determining the time trend in inequality are identified and the effect of mortality among out-of-wedlock births is examined. Implications of these findings for assessing the determinants of social inequality in infant mortality and evaluating the contribution of the National Health Service in its amelioration are discussed.

L'inégalité des classes sociales devant la mortalité infantile en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles de 1921 à 1980

Résumé

Cet article étudie l'évolution de l'inégalité sociale face à la mortalité infantile en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles entre 1921 et 1980, à l'aide de données décomposées selon la classe et selon la profession. L'indice global d'inégalité employé utilise toutes les données disponibles, et sa sensibilité aux erreurs peut être évalué au moyen de techniques de diagnostic reconnues. L'auteur identifie les professions qui ont joué un rôle déterminant dans l'évolution de l'inégalité au cours du temps, et examine l'effet spécifique de la mortalité des enfants illégitimes. Elle envisage ce qu'impliquent ces résultats quant à l'identification des déterminants de l'inégalité sociale face à la mortalité infantile et à l'évaluation de la contribution du National Health Service aux progrès obtenus.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Science Publishers B.V 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elsie R. Pamuk
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.DecaturUSA

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